Pregnancy Category None

This powerful plant comes from the Amazon jungle. Ayahuasca is a name both for the plant and for a potion composed of yage and other ingredients (often including plants containing DMT). Disagreement exists about whether a particular name is properly applied to the plant, to the potion, or to both. Small doses of yage produce euphoria larger ones produce hallucinations (blue is reportedly a predominant color in the visual images). Sexual imagery has been noted, but debate exists on whether...

Dextromoramide

Pronunciation deks-troh-MOHR-a-meyed Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 357-56-2. (Tartrate form 292244-3) Formal Names Alcoid, Dauran, Dimorlin, Jetrium, Linfadol, Moramide, Narcolo, Palfium, Troxilan Type Depressant (opioid class). See page 24 Federal Schedule Listing Schedule I (DEA no. 9613) USA Availability Illegal to possess Uses. This drug was first identified in the 1950s. It has no officially sanctioned medical role in the United States but is used elsewhere for pain control in...

Butorphanol

Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 42408-82-2. (Tartrate form 5878699-5) Formal Names Dorphanol, Stadol, Stadol NS, Torbugesic Type Depressant (opioid class). See page 24 Federal Schedule Listing Schedule IV (DEA no. 9720) USA Availability Prescription Pregnancy Category C Uses. This pain reliever is a narcotic agonist antagonist, meaning that it acts like an opioid when used by itself but counteracts other opioids if given simultaneously with them the counteraction can be significant...

Diphenoxylate

Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 915-30-0. (Hydrochloride form 3810-80-8) Formal Names Diarphen, Eldox, Logen, Lomotil, Lonox, Protector, Reasec, Re-tardinr, Topergan Type Depressant (opioid class). See page 24 Federal Schedule Listing Schedule II or V, depending on product formulation (DEA no. 9170) USA Availability Prescription and nonprescription Uses. Diphenoxylate was developed in the 1950s but did not see much use until the next decade. The drug is related to meperidine. When...

Remifentanil

Pronunciation rehm-ih-FEHN-tuh-nill Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 132875-61-7. (Hydrochloride form 132539-07-2) Type Depressant (opioid class). See page 24 Federal Schedule Listing Schedule II (DEA no. 9739) USA Availability Prescription Pregnancy Category C Uses. This drug is related to fentanyl and became available for medical purposes in the United States during the 1990s. Remifentanil is used for pain relief and to help induce anesthesia. Depending on the type of measurement...

Psilocybin

Pronunciation seye-loh-SEYE-bin (also pronounced seye-loh-SIB-in) Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 520-52-5 Formal Names Psilocibin Informal Names Blue Caps, Boomer, Buttons, God's Flesh, Hombrecitos, Las Mu-jercitas, Liberty Caps, Little Smoke, Magic Mushroom, Mexican Mushrooms, Mushies, Mushrooms, Mushroom Soup, Mushroom Tea, Musk, Pizza Toppings, Rooms, Sacred Mushroom, Shrooms, Silly Putty, Simple Simon, Teonanacatl Type Hallucinogen. See page 25 Federal Schedule Listing Schedule...

Barbiturate Class

Barbiturates were introduced into medical practice during the early 1900s, for combating insomnia, anxiety, and seizures. Despite occasional flurries of concern, not until the 1960s did much alarm grow about barbiturates in the United States. Members of a U.S. Senate subcommittee began portraying the drug class as a menace in the 1970s, and afterward stricter controls were put on use. Barbiturates and alcohol have similar effects. If someone intoxicated by alcohol takes barbiturates, the...

Triazolam

Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 28911-01-5 Formal Names Halcion Type Depressant (benzodiazepine class). See page 21 Federal Schedule Listing Schedule IV (DEA no. 2887) USA Availability Prescription Pregnancy Category X Uses. Triazolam became available for medical use in the United States during the 1980s. The substance is supposed to be used for treating insomnia on a short-term basis (typically one or two weeks), but sometimes prescribers tell patients to take the medicine for...